So you want to know how to become a magician? Let me start with a simple question…why do you want to know how to be a magician?

  • Is it to know all the secrets?
  • Is it to impress others?
  • Is it to pick up girls (or boys)?
  • Is it to become a working magician?
If you want to know how to become a magician people love, learn to care about others.
You need to build rapport with your audience to make them like you, and the best way of doing so is to genuinely care about them.

There are no right or wrong answers to these questions. You could have many reasons why you want to know how to be a magician, and they are all perfectly okay.

Knowing your goal will help you achieve it both faster and with greater quality.

No matter your reasons, you need to understand one crucial part. Magic is not about you. Even if you specialize in cardistry or any other form of “expressionist magic,” it’s about what kind of experience you can give to your audience that matters.

You see, the big difference between a magician people like and a magician people dislike is the way he/she interacts with the audience.

You need to build rapport with your audience to make them like you, and the best way of doing so is to genuinely care about them.

It’s not about the tricks you do, and it’s not about your props or if you know the latest slights.

(If you think about it, magic is the only art where you practice something with the goal of not showing it to anyone.)

Examples on how to become a magician people like

With this in mind, if you want to know how to be a magician that people like, you must focus on your audience.

But what does that mean in reality?

For example, I try as often as possible to give my spectators magical powers.

If I’m doing a simple “find your selected card” trick, I always make the spectator the star of the show by asking them to “snap their fingers” or “say the magic word.”

That way, it’s not me doing the trick, it’s the spectator. Don’t get me wrong; everyone understands that without me, the trick wouldn’t work. But that doesn’t matter.

When I ask Alex to “snap his fingers” to make the chosen card appear at the top, Alex and his friends become involved. Much more so than if I were to snap my fingers.

Another example.

Say I’m approaching a group of people at a corporate event. I would NEVER start with something as blunt as “here, pick a card.”

Why should they? They don’t know me. They don’t care. For all they know, I could be some freak trying to infiltrate their group.

A far better way is to approach the group, introduce myself, and ask if everything is okay. Are they having a good time?

If it feels right, I will then explain that I’m the house magician and go into my first routine.

Do you see the difference? In both these examples, it’s not about me and what I can do. It’s about them.

And this is the big secret on how to become a magician people love.

Take the focus away from you, and shine the light at your spectators.